North Jersey Section
American Chemical Society

Mass Spectrometry Topical Group Meetings

back

(Recent Event)

Apr 12, 2017 – MSDG Meeting

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group

The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group is pleased to announce our April Monthly Meeting.

NJ MSDG is the second largest mass spectrometry professional association in the nation behind ASMS, with over 1,100 members in the tristate area. [ homepage ]

Date:    Wednesday April 12, 2017

Venue:   Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater
        195 Davidson Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873

Sponsor: SCIEX

SCIEX


Please  register here.  Registration is free.

Program

5:30 PM    Social and Registration  
6:15 PM    Complimentary Dinner
7:00 PM    Welcome and Opening Remarks
7:05 PM    Speakers

Speaker 1:  Melanie Juba, PhD

Advanced Workflow Specialist, SCIEX

“The Simpler and Faster Solution for Routine Biopharmaceutical Characterization”

Abstract:

The X500B QTOF is a new instrument and software solution that improves robustness and reliability, reduces complexity and streamlines analysis workflows so that everyone using the instrument can get expert results. It is the first true benchtop, high-resolution mass spectrometer purpose-built for biologics characterization. Combining intuitive and powerful new software tools with a robust, reliable, and compact instrument, the X500B system is specifically designed to make characterization tasks simpler and to get biotherapeutic characterization answers faster.

Speaker 2:  Ian Moore, Ph.D.

Global Technical Marketing Manager, Pharma Quant and MetID, SCIEX

“Confident and Powerful MetID for all Your Therapeutic Molecules”

Abstract:

The SCIEX Biotransform Solution featuring the new MetabolitePilot 2.0 software is a powerful combination of hardware and software that will accelerate MetID by providing automated metabolite structure generation and a dedicated workflow for peptides and ADCs. Featuring SWATH data-independent acquisition on either the TripleTOF 6600 system or X500 QTOF system, the SCIEX Biotransform Solution ensures consistent and reproducible MS/MS are collected for all detectable species, resulting in reliable detection and identification from a single injection. With brand new workflows for peptides and ADCs and multiple peak finding strategies utilizing MS and MS/MS information MetabolitePilot 2.0 software is specifically designed to make MetID for these complex molecules simpler and easier.

2017-04-12

(Recent Event)

Mar 20, 2017 – MSDG Meeting

Note:  This meeting was rescheduled from March 14 due to a snowstorm.

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group

The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group is pleased to announce our March Monthly Meeting.

NJ MSDG is the second largest mass spectrometry professional association in the nation behind ASMS, with over 1,100 members in the tristate area. [ homepage ]

Date:    Monday March 20, 2017

Venue:   Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater
        195 Davidson Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873

Sponsor: Waters

Waters

Please  register here.  Registration is free.

Program

5:30 PM    Social and Registration  
6:15 PM    Complimentary Dinner
7:00 PM    Welcome and Opening Remarks
7:05 PM    Speakers

Speaker 1:  Guodong Chen

Bioanalytical and Discovery Analytical Sciences, Pharmaceutical Candidate Optimization, Research and Development, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

“Applications of Mass Spectrometry in Analytical Characterization of Biologics”

Abstract:

Since the introduction of the first recombinant DNA-derived protein insulin in the 1980s and the launch of Interferons and Interleukins in the 1990s, biologics market has shown a healthy growth. This is largely due to advances in recombinant DNA technology that have provided the means to produce therapeutic proteins. Mass spectrometry is uniquely positioned to cope with additional challenges for the analysis of biologics, due to its analytical sensitivity and specificity. This presentation will present current status and trends in MS characterization of biologics, including primary structural analysis and higher order structure characterization.

Speaker 2:  Min Du

Sr. Biopharmaceutical Business Development Manager, Waters Corporation

“Deploying a Fit for Purpose LCMS Platform in Regulated Development and QC for Multi-Attribute Monitoring”

Abstract:

High resolution analytical technologies are moving out of the realm of characterization and into the regulated environments of late development, manufacturing and QC organizations. Analytical managers are now challenged to not only develop an effective characterization strategy, but participate in the lifecycle planning of those assays as they evolve into attribute monitoring, and validated release assays for a commercial product. Harmonization of platforms across these organizations has remained a challenge to this process, but the development of platforms for both high resolution and routine nominal mass detection that can be deployed across an entire organization have fueled great interest progressing LCMS analysis later in development and into QC organizations. While peptide-centric monitoring of multiple product variants has recently generated great interest and concerns, there is already a progression of developing and validating intact/subunit mass profiling QC release assays. In this seminar, we will discuss the benefits of applying the HRMS QTof platform under UNIFI for comprehensive primary structural characterization in support discovery and development efforts, transitioning this platform into regulated late development with a mix of targeted monitoring and new variant identification workflow, and multiple strategies at the intact/subunit mass and peptide map level for effective deployment of critical assays into a QC-lot release environment.

2017-03-20

(Recent Event)

Mar 14, 2017 – MSDG Meeting

Note:  This event was postponed to March 20 due to snowstorm.

2017-03-14

(Past Event)

Oct 11, 2016 – MSDG Meeting

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group
The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group is pleased to announce our October Monthly Meeting.

NJ MSDG is the second largest mass spectrometry professional association in the nation behind ASMS, with over 1,100 members in the tristate area. [ homepage ]

Date:    October 11, 2016

Venue:   Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater
        195 Davison Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873

Sponsor: ThermoFisher Scientific

Please  register here.  Registration is free.

Program

5:30 PM    Social and Registration  
6:15 PM     Complimentary Dinner
7:00 PM    Welcome and Opening Remarks
7:05 PM     Speakers

Speaker 1: Dr. Michael Blank

“Knowledge is Power. A multiple attribute QC workflow for lot release and quality by design approaches”

Speaker 2: Dr. Aaron Bailey

“Travel By Land or Air: Complete Characterization of Biologics with Q Exactive BioPharma”

2016-10-11

(Past Event)

Sep 13, 2016 – MSDG Symposium & Vendor Show

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group
The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group is pleased again this year to announce our “Annual NJMSDG Vendor Night, Meeting and Poster Session”.

NJ MSDG is the second largest mass spectrometry professional association in the nation behind ASMS, with over 1,100 members in the tristate area. [ homepage ]

We had a fantastic turn out for our last year’s vendor show (~250 attendees) with guest lectures given by luminaries such as Professor Tom Baillie (former VP of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics at Merck and currently Dean Emeritus at University of Washington School of Pharmacy), and Professor Richard Capprioli (Stanford Moore Chair in Biochemistry and Director of the Mass Spectrometry Research Center at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine).

This year, we are pleased to announce that Professor David Muddiman, from North Carolina State University, will be one of our guest lecturer. The other presentation will be given by Dr. Wilson Shou of Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.

Don’t miss this incredible network, learning and cross-fertilization opportunity. Save the date!

      September 13, 2016

Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater

    195 Davison Avenue, Somerset, NJ 08873

More than 200 attendees expected

Please  register here.  Registration is free.

Program

2:30 – 8:00 PM         Vendor Show

2:30 – 3:00 PM         Vendor Set Up – Hotel Ballroom

3:00 – 4:00 PM         Registration – Hotel Ballroom

4:15 – 4:45 PM         Cocktail Break / vendor interaction

4:45 – 5:45 PM        Presentation by Professor David Muddiman (North Carolina State University)  Title: Working Around the Cluck:  A Systems Biology Approach to Understanding the Origin and Biology of Ovarian Cancer.

7:00 – 8:00 PM        Presentation by Dr. Wilson Shou (from BMS) , Title:  Quest for a Mass Spectrometry-Based Plate Reader:  Coupling Laser Diode Thermal Desorption (LDTD) with Nanoliter Sample Transfer for Label-free High Throughput Screening

Abstract: Dr. David Muddiman

Mass spectrometry offers the most robust platform to discover and characterize new diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic biomarkers for ovarian cancer across all molecular classes. Moreover, a systems biology approach will allow the underlying biology and origin of ovarian cancer to be understood. This presentation will discuss the challenges specific to the study of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in humans and how these challenges have directed our thinking in terms of the development of model organisms and mass spectrometry-based bioanalytical strategies. First, to augment the human model, we developed the domestic hen model of spontaneous EOC, which allowed us to longitudinally sample the rapid onset and progression of the disease in a controlled environment. Second, we developed bioanalytical tools to characterize structurally challenging analytes that are critical to a systems-level analysis. To increase the electrospray response of N-linked glycans, we synthesized novel hydrophobic tagging reagents which have the added benefit of being able to incorporate a stable-isotope label for relative quantification experiments (INLIGHTTM). Furthermore, we developed a novel ionization technique for tissue imaging of lipids and metabolites. This unique model organism has and continues to provide new insights into the biology of ovarian cancer; combined with other –OMICS data obtained through these novel bioanalytical approaches, we will understand the origin of ovarian cancer and ultimately translate that knowledge to humans.

 Biography

David C. Muddiman is the Jacob and Betty Belin Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Founder and Director of the W.M. Keck FTMS Laboratory for Human Health Research at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC. Prior to moving his research group to North Carolina State University, David was a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Founder and Director of the Mayo Proteomics Research Center at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, MN. Prior to his appointment at the Mayo Clinic, David was an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Virginia Commonwealth University where he began his academic career as an assistant professor in 1997 with an adjunct appointment in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics where he was also a member of the Massey Cancer Center. David was born in Long Beach, CA in 1967 but spent most of his formative years in a small town in Pennsylvania. David received his B.S. in chemistry from Gannon University (Erie, PA) in 1990 and his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh in 1995 under the auspices of David M. Hercules. He then was a Department of Energy Postdoctoral Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory working with Richard D. Smith from 1995-1997. Dr. Muddiman is Editor of Analytical and Biological Chemistry and Associate Editor of the Encyclopedia of Analytical Chemistry as well as on the Editorial Advisory Board of Mass Spectrometry Reviews, Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, and the Journal of Chromatography B. He also serves on the advisory board of the NIH Funded Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, University of Georgia and the Yale/NIDA Neuroproteomics Center, Yale University. Dr. Muddiman served as a member of the ASMS Board of Directors and Treasurer of US-HUPO; he is currently the President of US HUPO. His group has presented over 500 invited lectures and presentations at national and international meetings including 20 plenary/keynote lectures. His group has published over 225 peer-reviewed papers and has received four US patents. He is the recipient of the 2015 ACS Award in Chemical Instrumentation, 2010 Biemann Medal, American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2009 NCSU Alumni Outstanding Research Award, the 2004 ACS Arthur F. Findeis Award, the 1999 American Society for Mass Spectrometry Research Award, and the 1990-91 Safford Award, University of Pittsburgh, for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Muddiman’s research directed at the development of innovative technologies, systems biology, and model organisms is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and The United States Department of Agriculture.

Abstract:Dr. Wilson Shou

Improvements in mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical throughput have been achieved using laser desorption ionization (LDI) techniques and this has led to increased utility for this technology amongst research groups supporting early drug discovery efforts.  In particular, lead discovery teams that perform high-throughput screening (HTS) assays that are intended to identify active compounds against therapeutic targets of interest have begun to adopt this label-free methodology as an orthogonal screening approach to well-established fluoresence-based assays. Furthermore, optimization of the “hits” identified through HTS requires additional in vitro studies to assess absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) properties by lead profiling groups who prefer to use native, clinically-relevant substrates.  Since HTS and HT-ADME groups can generate thousands of samples on a daily basis, it is necessary to have high-throughput analytical platforms capable of processing these demands.  The move towards label-free screening in drug discovery has increased the demand for mass spectrometry-based analysis, and because of this, it is important to explore new technologies aimed at improving MS-based readout speeds in order to continue to support the increasing sample volume demands of these groups.

Assays that utilize mass spectrometry for analysis are both sensitive and selective and offer the ability to provide label-free detection of physiologically relevant substrates and products.  MS-based methodologies, however, have traditionally relied upon liquid chromatography (LC) or on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) as front-end sample delivery mechanisms. Because of this, they typically have slow cycle times that aren’t amenable to high throughput screening efforts. Using newer approaches that employ laser desorption techniques to directly introduce the contents of wells into the mass spectrometer, it is possible to achieve throughputs that approach those of plate-reader assays and meet the demands of early discovery screening applications. Here we investigated the approach of coupling nanoliter sample deposition with Laser Diode Thermal Desorption (LDTD) – tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and evaluated its utility in providing an ultra high-throughput, label-free detection method for various applications in HTS and HT-ADME groups.

2016-09-13

(Past Event)

Jun 14, 2016 – MSDG Meeting

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group

The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group presents its June meeting on Tuesday, June 14, 2016 at at the Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater, 195 Davidson Ave, Somerset NJ 08873 [ hotel website ]

Sponsored by Shimadzu

Shimadzu
The evening is free for attendees, courtesy of our sponsor!

Please register here.

Program

5:30 pm Social and registration

6:15 pm Complimentary dinner

7:00 pm Welcome and opening remarks

7:05 pm Speakers

Seminar Speakers

I. Evelyn Wang, PhD Candidate, August 2016

University of Texas at Arlington

Intact Protein quantitation using a Triple Quadrapole Mass Spectrometer 

ABSTRACT: 

The demand is increasing for protein detection and quantitation in biological fluids for disease detection, protein therapeutics monitoring, and drug development.  Current methods use highly sensitive and specific triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS) to quantify protein-digested peptides to then correlate original intact protein concentrations in the sample.  This bottom-up method for protein quantitation can introduce errors.  Therefore, for more accurate protein quantitation researchers use expensive isotopically labeled proteins for standards.  A method that bypasses the protein digestion step to directly quantify intact proteins on QqQ-MS was developed and will be presented.   Myoglobin, cytochrome c, lactalbumin, lysozyme, and ubiquitin were selected as protein standards for the proof-of-principle work.  Our intact protein quantitation method was developed on a Shimadzu LCMS-8050 QqQ-MS utilizing multiple reaction monitoring (MRM).  The experimental pathway and associated challenges that ultimately led to MRM transitions for all protein standards will be shown.   The result was calibration curves of respectable linearity (R2>0.99).  Further, in order to address complex matrices in biological fluids for future applications, a generic reversed-phase chromatography method was developed on Restek Wide Pore Viva C4, C8, C18, Biphenyl, and PFP Propyl (2.1 x 100 mm; 5 μm; 300 Å) columns.  Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was also included in the study to prove the feasibility of the method for both the liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry aspects.  Specificity of the MRM detection was evaluated for both urine and plasma matrices.  The method is envisioned to be a model for future development of targeted methods for analysis of important disease indicators such as proteins in biological fluids, especially for clinical diagnostic and treatment advancements.

II. Scott A. Kuzdzal, PhD 

General Manager of Marketing, Shimadzu Scientific Instruments

Fully Integrated & Automated LC-MS/MS Sample Preparation and a Brief Introduction to other New Innovations from Shimadzu

ABSTRACT: 

In clinical and pharmaceutical laboratories, time is money. Sample preparation for the detection of target analytes such as steroids and immunosuppressant drugs in serum by LC-MS/MS typically involves complex, offline extraction methods such as solid phase extraction or liquid/liquid extraction, both of which require additional sample concentration and reconstitution in appropriate solvents.  These sample preparation methods are time-consuming, often taking one hour or more per sample, and are more vulnerable to variability due to errors in manual preparation.  We herein present the full integration and automation of steroid and immunosuppressant assay sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis using an innovative, automated sample preparation instrument (CLAM-2000) coupled directly to Shimadzu ultra-fast mass spectrometry. This completely integrated, automated quantification method for immunosuppressant and steroid drug compounds allows routine analysis with high data quality/precision, reduced time, increased throughput and enhanced safety.

This talk will also introduce a new ultra-high speed LCMS system for multiplexed analyses that allows users to double the throughput of an existing method.  In an analysis of four biomarker compounds for the four major molecular species in the Cytochrome P450 family, the innovative, new Nexera-MX system completed the analysis in only 38 seconds whereas conventional HPLC required one minute and twenty-two seconds.

2016-06-14

(Past Event)

May 3, 2016 – MSDG Meeting

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group

The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group presents its May Meeting on Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at at the Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater, 195 Davidson Ave, Somerset NJ 08873 [ hotel website ]

Sponsored by Waters

Waters
The evening is free for attendees, courtesy of our sponsor!

Please register here.

Featured Speakers:

I. Andrew D. Mahan, Ph.D.

Scientist Janssen Biotherapeutics

“Improvements in Qtof Technology to drive discovery & development of Biologics”

II. Weibin Chen Ph.D

Director Waters Corporation Scientific Operations Biopharmaceutical Business Division

“Advancing Attribute Control of Monoclonal Antibody and Its Derivatives using High Resolution Ion-Mobility Qtof Mass Spectrometry”

Program

5:30 pm – Social and registration
6:15 pm – Complimentary dinner
7:00 pm – Welcome and opening remarks
7:05 pm – Speakers

 

2016-05-03

(Past Event)

Mar 8, 2016 – MSDG Meeting

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group

The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group presents its March Meeting on Tuesday, Mar 8, 2016 at at the Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater, 195 Davidson Ave, Somerset NJ 08873 [ hotel website ]

Sponsored by Bruker Daltonics

Bruker Datonics, Inc
The evening is free for attendees, courtesy of our sponsor!

Please register here.

Featured Speakers:

I. Dr. Sergei Dikler

Technical Project Manager,
Bruker Daltonics Inc., Billerica, MA

“MALDI High-Throughput Screening beyond 100,000 Samples per Day in Drug Discovery”

II. Dr. Reid Groseclose

Senior Investigator – DMPK, US (R&D Platform Technology & Science),
GSK, King of Prussia, PA

“Imaging Mass Spectrometry: Visualizing Biology and Chemistry in Drug Development”

Program

5:30 pm – Social and registration
6:15 pm – Complimentary dinner
7:00 pm – Welcome and opening remarks
7:05 pm – Speakers

Abstract for Talk I:

A novel automation system for high throughput screening in Drug Discovery has been developed with label-free molecular detection via high speed MALDI TOF MS analysis. The scalable solution features comprehensive robotic automation with sample preparation from assay plates, automated sample / matrix deposition and automated high density target plate processing with MALDI MS detection for unattended screening of thousands of samples per day. Assay development time is rapid, consumable and solvent usage / cost is minimized, and sample “readoutd” is 10x faster than other Mass Spectrometry workflows.

Abstract for Talk II:

Understanding the tissue distribution of a drug and its metabolites is an essential element in the development of safe and efficacious drugs. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) can determine the spatial distribution of an unlabeled drug and its metabolites in a tissue section with high sensitivity and specificity. Detailed molecular images of both exogenous and endogenous analytes can be correlated with the underlying tissue histology to produce very high information content datasets. This integrated imaging modality offers the potential to enhance our mechanistic understanding of disease progression and pharmacology (including toxicology) by providing snap shots of temporal and causal changes. Equally important, this new tool can serve as a common platform for engaging pathologist, clinicians, biologists and chemists in addressing a wide range of biological and chemical challenges.

This presentation will focus on our efforts to couple IMS and histology in drug development to gain mechanistic insights into drug correlated toxicities and efficacy. Case studies from early and late stage drug development where IMS was employed to investigate the mechanisms of adverse events, establish PK/PD relationships, and guide risk assessment will be presented.

Bio for Dr Dikler :

Sergei Dikler received his Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from the Texas A&M University under direction of Professor David H. Russell. Dr. Dikler joined Bruker Daltonics and has been working in the Applications Group specializing in MALDI-TOF/TOF applications. He led or participated in the new product development projects such as the development of MALDI PharmaPulse system and the development of NALDI targets. Dr. Dikler worked on new method development for MALDI-TOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF instruments including high-throughput screening, de novo sequencing of neuropeptides, clinical proteomics, LC-MALDI, species identification based on intact protein profiling, top-down and middle-down sequencing of intact proteins and many other projects that resulted in numerous conference presentations and papers in peer reviewed journals. In 2009 his work was featured in Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News magazine.

Bio for Dr Groseclose:

Reid Groseclose is a Senior Investigator in the Bioimaging group at GlaxoSmithKline located in Upper Merion, Pennsylvania. Reid received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Tennessee in 2004 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Vanderbilt University in 2009 in the lab of Richard Caprioli, where his work focused on exploring the utility of MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and proteomics for the analysis and classification of cancerous tissues. He joined GlaxoSmithKline in 2009, where his research interests have centered on the application of MALDI IMS to determine the tissue distribution of drugs and their metabolites and investigating the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, pharmacology and toxicology.

2016-03-08

(Past Event)

Nov 11, 2015 – MSDG Meeting

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group

The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group presents its November meeting on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 at at the Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater, 195 Davidson Ave, Somerset NJ 08873 [ hotel website ]

Sponsored by Shimadzu

Shimadzu
The evening is free for attendees, courtesy of our sponsor!

Please register here.

Program

5:30 pm Social and registration

6:15 pm Complimentary dinner

7:00 pm Welcome and opening remarks

7:05 pm Speakers

Seminar Speakers

I. Ruth Verplaetse, PhD

Q2 (a Quintiles Quest Joint Venture)

Quantitative Determination of Opioids in Whole Bloodusing Fully Automated Dried Blood Spot DesorptionCoupled to On-line SPE-LC-MS/MS

II. Jeff Dahl, PhD

Application Scientist, Shimadzu Scientific Instruments

Shimadzu Technical Innovations and Collaborations in UFMS

ABSTRACT for Dr Verplaetse: Opioids are well known, widely used painkillers. Increased stability of opioids in the dried blood spot (DBS) matrix compared to blood/plasma has been described. Other benefits provided by DBS techniques include point-of-care collection, less invasive micro sampling, more economical shipment and convenient storage. Current methodology for analysis of micro whole blood samples for opioids is limited to the classical DBS workflow including tedious manual punching of the DBS cards followed by extraction and LC-MS/MS bioanalysis. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a fully automated on-line sample preparation procedure for the analysis of DBS micro samples relevant to the detection of opioids in finger prick blood. To this end, automated flow-through elution of DBS cards was followed by on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysis by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Selective, sensitive, accurate and reproducible quantitation of five representative opioids in human blood at sub-therapeutic, therapeutic and toxic levels was achieved. The range of reliable response (R2 ≥0.997) was 1 to 500 ng/mL whole blood for morphine, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone and 0.1 to 50 ng/mL for fentanyl. Inter-day, intra-day and matrix inter-lot accuracy and precision was less than 15% (even at LLOQ level). The method was successfully used to measure hydrocodone and its major metabolite norhydrocodone in incurred human samples. Our data support the enormous potential of DBS sampling and automated analysis for monitoring opioids as well as other pharmaceuticals in both anti-doping and pain management regimens.

 

2015-11-11

(Past Event)

Oct 20, 2015 – MSDG Meeting

NJ-ACS Mass Spec Discussion Group

The NJ Mass Spectrometry Discussion Group presents its October meeting on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 at at the Holiday Inn Somerset-Bridgewater, 195 Davidson Ave, Somerset NJ 08873 [ hotel website ]

Sponsored by Thermo Fisher Scientific

Thermo Fisher Scientific

The evening is free for attendees, courtesy of our sponsor!

Please register here.

Program

5:30 pm Social and registration

6:15 pm Complimentary dinner

7:00 pm Welcome and opening remarks

7:05 pm Speakers

Seminar Speakers

Dr. Guilong Charles Cheng

Team Lead, Product Characterization, Alexion Pharmaceutical, Inc

Detailed Characterization of Therapeutic Proteins on An Orbitrap Platform

ABSTRACT: Therapeutic proteins, including recombinant monoclonal antibodies are inherently heterogeneous, due to various enzymatic and non-enzymatic modifications occurred during different stages of processes from cell culture to storage. N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine variation, glycation, glycosylation variation, incomplete disulfide bond formation, deamidation and oxidation are just a starting list of modifications commonly found in an antibody. This complexity posts great challenges not only for MS hardware perspective for both sensitivity and dynamic range, but also for the backend data analysis, which has vastly different requirements than the traditional proteomic data analysis approach. This presentation will provide recent examples on the use of an Orbitrap Fusion platform along with PepFinder software to examine the digestion protocols for our mAb, to characterize charged species in the release assay, as well as to understand degradation mechanisms and applications in product comparability.

Joshua J. Nicklay & Keeley M. Murphy

Thermo Fisher Scientific

A High Resolution Accurate Mass Approach for Reliable and Sensitive Quantitation

ABSTRACT: As potential leads for successful drug candidates move through the drug discovery process, there is a need for quantitative in vitro and in vivo analysis at each step.  The requirement for quantitative assays that provide accuracy, sensitivity, reproducibility, and broad linear response has remained a constant. As mass spectrometry technology has progressed over time other aspects also play an important role in meeting the needs of these assays.  Ease of use, simplified method development and the availability of troubleshooting tools now represent important factors when choosing the most appropriate technology for a particular assay and the corresponding method development.  Here we will explore the benefits of a high resolution accurate mass approach for quantitative analysis in regards to ease of use and method development as well as overall assay performance.

2015-10-20

Photos From 2012 Events


2011 Meeting Calendar

2010 Meeting Calendar

2009 Meeting Calendar

Top